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Video: Watch an F-22 Raptor Fly in Incredible Super-Slow Motion

F-22 Slow-Motion
F-22 Raptor, US Air Force. Image Credit: YouTube Screenshot.

Sometimes you have to see it in action to believe it. At 1945, we love writing about combat airplanes, but sometimes our text and still-photos do not do an aircraft complete justice. That’s why we’d like to show you an F-22 Raptor in super slow-motion video to see just how versatile and even how beautiful this airplane looks like in flight.

How Did They Do It?

But first, let’s share some background about this video for some added context.

The flight was filmed in 2020 over Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson in Anchorage, Alaska. The pilot is Major Joshua “Cabo” Gunderson.

The camera used was the Hollywood-cinema quality Phantom Flex4K camera. The Phantom Flex4K makes highly detailed 4K imaging at 1,000 fps. The high-speed 1,000 frames per second allows film professionals to create a super slow-motion effect during playback.

The “Phantom of the Raptor”

So, what they did was to load the Phantom Flex4K onto a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter. The helicopter hovered at 3,000 feet while the F-22 did all kinds of trick flying – sometimes while inverted. It did barrel rolls and other maneuvers.

Meanwhile, a cinematographer named Dustin Farrell shot the action, so you can’t do this at home. He named the film “Phantom of the Raptor,” after his favorite camera.

Take a look at this cinematic mastery of the F-22 in flight above.

Now, the intelligence analyst in me is a little worried. This video is public access so it means the Russian and Chinese militaries can watch this too and study the F-22’s aerodynamics and maneuvers. Maybe the pilot gave away a little too much of Air Force combat flight tactics and techniques. It’s not clear if the Department of Defense has given this film its seal of approval. But the video is inspiring and would encourage more than one aspiring pilot to join the Air Force in the hopes of becoming an F-22 aviator someday.

1945’s new Defense and National Security Editor, Brent M. Eastwood, PhD, is the author of Humans, Machines, and Data: Future Trends in Warfare. He is an Emerging Threats expert and former U.S. Army Infantry officer.

Written By

Now serving as 1945s New Defense and National Security Editor, Brent M. Eastwood, PhD, is the author of Humans, Machines, and Data: Future Trends in Warfare. He is an Emerging Threats expert and former U.S. Army Infantry officer.

3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Dan

    November 20, 2021 at 11:37 am

    Yay. Our 187 F-22’s can fly nice, assuming their OBOGS systems are delivering O2 to the pilots….

    The F-22 was supposed to replace the F-15 — all 1200 of them. It was supposed to cost $50,000,000 each.

    The F-22 line closed in 2011. The F-15 line is still open.

    Do we actually go to war with only 187 air superiority fighters?

  2. Victor H. Ocasio

    November 20, 2021 at 6:56 pm

    Awesome job 👏 with the cinematography!
    What a beautiful Plane!
    Just ❤ love it.

  3. Will Smith

    November 22, 2021 at 3:34 pm

    I probably shouldn’t even say this. It’s probably classified. What’s holding the F-22 back? The pilot! So, are we building pilotless G-22’s? Also hold it back is it can only carry a limited number of missiles. We need heavy bombers carrying lots of missiles to back up the F-22’s. Maybe even supersonic heavy drones. Peace be with you

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