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Child Tax Credit 2022 Update: Why More Checks Could Still Happen

Child Tax Credit
US Treasure Check. Image Credit: Creative Commons.

Senators hold out hope on survival of child tax credit: Long before the expanded child tax credit was instituted in the American Rescue Plan Act in the spring of 2021, Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) was pushing for the idea.

Vox reported in 2017 that Brown, along with Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado, had proposed what they called the American Family Act of 2017, which would have significantly increased the existing child tax credit. The bill did not pass at the time, as Donald Trump was president and the Republicans controlled the Senate at the time. But the idea was revived in 2020, once Joseph Biden had been elected president and the Democrats had captured the Senate majority.

When the child tax credit was included in the Rescue Plan Act, Sen. Brown sent out a press release, praising the president for including the idea in the legislation and calling it “one of the most transformative policies to come out of Washington in generations.”

Throughout 2021, Brown called for the child tax credit to be extended permanently, and keeping the child tax credit alive was a big part of the White House’s agenda in 2021. However, while a one-year extension of the credit was in the version of the Build Back Better legislation that passed in the House, Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) expressed his opposition to the current version of the bill, specifically expressing skepticism about the child tax credit provision. The Democrats will likely need the votes of all 50 Democratic senators to pass any major legislation.

Even after that, Sen. Brown isn’t giving up on the child tax credit surviving, even as at least January will go by without U.S. families receiving such a payment.

According to the Washington Post’s The Early newsletter, which interviewed some of the strongest supporters of the credit in Congress, those lawmakers are not giving up on the credit.

“There is such great interest in this among Senate Democrats and in the public that we’re just not going to let this die,” Sen. Brown told the newspaper, adding that he didn’t want to negotiate with Manchin through the media, but that he’ll “do whatever it takes to get this done.”

Senators also told the Post that they are not interested in adding a work requirement to the proposal, which was something that Manchin had proposed earlier in the fall of 2021. Manchin reiterated that position in an interview last week, adding that he wants an income cap for the tax credit as well.

The New York Times last week looked at why the child tax credit isn’t more popular, citing data that following the emergency spending in the first year of the pandemic, Americans have become less favorable to such a large government role.

 Stephen Silver is a journalist, essayist and film critic, who is also a contributor to The Philadelphia Inquirer, Philly Voice, Philadelphia Weekly, the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Living Life Fearless, Backstage magazine, Broad Street Review and Splice Today. The co-founder of the Philadelphia Film Critics Circle, Stephen lives in suburban Philadelphia with his wife and two sons. Follow him on Twitter at @StephenSilver.

Written By

Stephen Silver is a journalist, essayist, and film critic, who is also a contributor to Philly Voice, Philadelphia Weekly, the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, Living Life Fearless, Backstage magazine, Broad Street Review, and Splice Today. The co-founder of the Philadelphia Film Critics Circle, Stephen lives in suburban Philadelphia with his wife and two sons. Follow him on Twitter at @StephenSilver.

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