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Ruger 10/22 Takedown: One of the Best Rifles Ever?

The Ruger 10/22 Takedown is an incredibly popular rifle for good reasons – There’s always something fun about shooting a 10/22 because they’re usually lightweight and have practically no kick.

Ruger 10/22. Image Credit: Creative Commons.
Ruger 10/22. Image Credit: Creative Commons.

The Ruger 10/22 is indeed not powerful or built for taking out large prey when hunting, and some would argue you would not want to use it for home defense.

However, the Ruger 10/22 is quite popular and just won’t be denied as it keeps selling year after year.

Could the newer Ruger 10/22 Takedown be among the greats? 

The Ruger 10/22 Takedown is an incredibly popular rifle for good reasons There’s always something fun about shooting a 10/22 because they’re usually lightweight and have practically no kick.

While the Ruger 10/22 Takedown had almost no recoil and some other positives, it wasn’t my favorite.

Ruger 10/22: A 2 Minute Review 

The first thing I noticed was that the Takedown was about 5 pounds when I loaded the 10-round magazine. That’s not even close to heavy for someone used to shooting an AR, but it’s got more heft than a lot of the 10/22 rifles out there.

On the other hand, one of the best features of this Ruger was that it can break down almost in half for easier carrying. The full length is about 3 feet long, but it can fit in my backpack and those 5 pounds don’t make much of a difference when I’m walking.

As for shooting, it didn’t blow me away. I know that .22LR is cheaper ammo, so it does jam and dirty the rifling more. Because of that, my spreads ranged from reasonable to as much as 5” apart. My best shot patterns came from higher-end rounds like CCI and Federal Target.

I did like that the manufacturer stock is textured to keep the recoil pad in place, so the Takedown didn’t move when I fired. It also helps that the .22LR is already a low-recoil bullet. However, the trigger left something to be desired with 6 pounds of tension and a hard reset.

That brings me to how customizable the Takedown is. Like most Ruger 10/22’s, you can swap out a lot of parts and I strongly recommend going with a trigger you’re comfortable with. I also had trouble seeing the front sight, so I ended up using an optic to help my precision.

One thing that did stand out for me was the magazine release.

A lot of the rifles I’ve fired in that caliber have sticky mag wells, but the Takedown smoothly released and I had no issues with the feed. It also doesn’t seem to matter what magazine brand I go with, so that’s a plus.

What One Expert Told 19FortyFive

“What I love about the 10/22 is that she is accurate, never jams, the ammo is cheap, and I know what I am going to get when I fire every single round. The Ruger 10/22 works, and that’s all I ever want in a rifle, what is wrong with that? I say nothing,” explained a former Baltimore police officer in an interview with 19FortyFive.

Ruger 10/22: The Bottomline 

Overall, the Ruger 10/22 Takedown rifle wasn’t my favorite for accuracy or weight, but it does fire a lot better once I switched the trigger and mounted a scope.

Still, for less than $400, the Takedown is solid in a pinch and highly portable in case of an emergency.

Ruger 10/22. Image Credit: Creative Commons.

Ruger 10/22 Takedown. Image Credit: Creative Commons.

Ruger 10/22. Image Credit: Creative Commons.

Ruger 10/22. Image Credit: Creative Commons. 

Richard Douglas writes on firearms, defense, and security issues. He is the founder and editor of Scopes Field, and a columnist at the National Interest, 1945, Daily Caller, and other publications.

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Written By

Richard Douglas is a long-time shooter, outdoor enthusiast, and technologist. He is the founder and editor of Scopes Field, and a columnist at The National Interest, Cheaper Than Dirt, Daily Caller, and other publications.

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