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Glock 30 Review: A Sub-Compact .45 with a Big Bite

Glock 30
Glock 30. Photo taken during the 2016 Asian Defence and Security (ADAS) Trade Show at the World Trade Center in Pasay, Metro Manila.

A sub-compact .45 almost seems too good to be true, but Glock listened to the market and released the Glock 30, a concealable pistol with a big bang.

Many believe the 30 is the top contender for the modern concealed carry weapon (CCW) 45. Does Glock’s design hold up to the beefy .45 ACP? Find out in my review of the Glock 30 below.

Accuracy

Glocks are particularly well-known for their accuracy, but the 30 (like other models) does just fine in terms of hitting where you’re aiming.

At about 10 yards the cluster of rounds was sitting between 1 and 2 inches apart.

The further I got from the target, the less I was able to put slugs on top of one another, but that’s expected to some extent.

Sub-compacts can be tough to get a good handle on, so it took me a little bit of time to get accustomed to the size, thus taking a toll on my accuracy.

As far as base accuracy, the Glock 30 is on par with every other pistol in its price range.

Don’t forget, Glocks are crazy customizable, so don’t push optics and other upgrades out of your mind just yet.

Glock 30

Glock 30. Image: Creative Commons.

Reliability

The Glock 30, like every other Glock (except the 44), is a masterclass in reliability.

You can beat this thing to Mexico and back and still have a great running pistol in your hand, albeit it a little dusty.

As always, you can expect the same Glock cycling and mysterious anti-jamming properties from the 30; it doesn’t matter what you run through it.

Recoil

.45 recoil is usually pretty stiff in small pistols and the Glock 30 is no exception to that.

That impact is immediately noticeable and dramatically more than 9mm which is my normal carry load.

The kick is snappy, but it’s not unbearable or particularly bothersome unless your hand slips, which can happen if you have larger hands.

The full-size Glock chambered in 45 ACP is a surprisingly soft shooting gun, but the benefits are lost on the 30.

Magazine and Capacity

Like every other item in this review, the magazines and reloading are exactly the same as other pistols under the Glock name.

It has the same polymer magazine, except it holds 10 rounds in the mag plus one.

Glock really benefits from this style, since reloading on the 30 is virtually the same as any Glock that’s ever been put in your hands.

Specifications

The Glock thirty has a meek overall length of 6.96 inches, a height of 4.8 inches, and a comparatively skinny width of 1.27 inches.

This is extraordinarily small for a .45 caliber pistol.

It won’t compliment your rifle too well, but it’ll do just fine tucked in a belt.

This small size was the trade-off for some heavy recoil, but it’s definitely worth it because of the 30’s concealability.

It might also be worth it to trade off a little concealability for some upgraded sights.

Price

The cost comes in at a modest $547, hovering at the same price range as most other Gen 4 Glocks. However, just like ammo, the price could be inflated due to various firearm and ammo shortages that are hitting the market pretty hard.

Is the Glock 30 Worth It?

Well, for me? No, but that’s just because I’m somewhat of a nine fanboy. 45 is fun but I don’t choose it for self-defense.

However, if you like 45 ACP, this could be a superb choice for you if you just can’t live without that stopping power.

Here’s why:

-Small, concealable pistol with a punch

-Reliability, no malfunctions as with all Glock’s products

-Stopping power, having such a big bullet in a small package is a great asset for self-defense or fun on the range.

Richard Douglas is a long-time shooter, outdoor enthusiast, and technologist. He is the founder and editor of Scopes Field, and a columnist at The National Interest, Cheaper Than Dirt, Daily Caller, and other publications.
Written By

Richard Douglas is a long-time shooter, outdoor enthusiast, and technologist. He is the founder and editor of Scopes Field, and a columnist at The National Interest, Cheaper Than Dirt, Daily Caller, and other publications.

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