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Russia Is In Sanctions Hell Thanks to Putin’s War in Ukraine

Russia Sanctions
Russian military drilling with artillery. Image Credit: Creative Commons.

The Russian invasion of Ukraine has brought an unprecedented, for modern times, backlash from the international community. A coalition of more than 37 countries, led by the United States, has imposed heavy sanctions on pretty much all aspects of the Russian way of life.

From the defense and aerospace industry to major financial institutions to oligarchs and individual family members of Russian President Vladimir Putin, the Western sanctions have restricted the Russian military and population in several ways.

For example, Russian commercial planes are prohibited from flying through the airspace of almost all of Europe.

Western Sanctions on Russia

The U.S. State Department came out with a report on the impact of sanctions and export controls on Russia. Since the war started on February 24, the U.S. alone has imposed approximately 2,250 sanctions (1,500 new and 750 amended) on Russia.

Some of the Western sanctions have targeted the Russian oil and natural gas industry by denying exports and/or transfer of oil refining products to Russia or Belarus, which is essentially a Russian proxy. Others have focused on luxury goods, imposing license requirements that prohibit the sale of those items in Russia, a measure intended to target the Russian oligarchs.

But what exactly has been the impact of the Western sanctions on Russia?

The Impact of the Western Economic Warfare over Ukraine

We should probably start by saying that some of the sanctions will take a long time to be effective.

For example, it is hard to judge the impact of a restriction on the travel of Russian citizens to Europe and to the U.S. Maybe the lack of movement and the opportunities, such as professional, personal, or academic, that often accompany travel will push more Russians against Putin and his authoritarian regime. Or maybe they will steer a nationalistic response by the Russian people and push them toward Putin.

Perhaps the Russian economy is the easiest target to gauge the effectiveness of sanctions and export controls.

According to the International Monetary Fund, the Russian economy is set to contract by approximately three percent this year. Moreover, a lot of the measures, especially those targeting the economy and financial sector, against Russia will mature over time. Foreign capital will be hard to come by as the prospects of doing business in Russia are unappealing, to say the least.

The U.S. and the West have also frozen more than $300 billion worth of assets owned by the Russian Central Bank, thus denying those funds from directly or indirectly supporting the war effort in Ukraine.

Here are some of the effects on the Russian economy and industry, according to the State Department assessment:

“Major supply shortages for Russian forces in Ukraine are forcing Russia to turn to less technologically advanced countries such as Iran and North Korea for supplies and equipment.

– Russia is struggling to import semiconductors and other key components. Export controls have forced Russia to cannibalize existing airline parts they can no longer access abroad.

– Russia’s military aviation program has been cut off from resupply provided by global aviation trade.

– Russia has reverted to Soviet-era defense stocks because our measures have interrupted Russian companies’ abilities to replenish domestic supply chains.

– Exports on certain goods and services, including dollar-denominated banknotes, accounting, management consulting, quantum computing, and trust and corporate formation services to persons located in the Russian Federation are now prohibited.”

Expert Biography: A 19FortyFive Defense and National Security Columnist, Stavros Atlamazoglou is a seasoned defense journalist specializing in special operations, a Hellenic Army veteran (national service with the 575th Marine Battalion and Army HQ), and a Johns Hopkins University graduate. His work has been featured in Business InsiderSandboxx, and SOFREP.

1945’s Defense and National Security Columnist, Stavros Atlamazoglou is a seasoned defense journalist with specialized expertise in special operations, a Hellenic Army veteran (national service with the 575th Marine Battalion and Army HQ), and a Johns Hopkins University graduate. His work has been featured in Business Insider, Sandboxx, and SOFREP.

21 Comments

21 Comments

  1. Serhio

    November 20, 2022 at 9:19 pm

    714-рв от 15.11.22

  2. Serhio

    November 20, 2022 at 9:20 pm

    It seems that 1945 decided to help Stavros pay off the loan. His articles appear as if from a machine gun. But the articles are empty. The enumeration of sanctions and nothing more. There is no analysis of how these sanctions can change the Russian economy. A simple example: in 2014, the West imposed sanctions on Russia. In response, Russia banned the import of some of the food produced in the West. What is the result? Russia has become one of the largest grain exporters, sharply increasing exports of wheat, barley, corn and other cereals. In 2014, grain exports amounted to 30 million tons. In 2016, 33.5 million tons. In 2018, 54.8 million tons. In 2020, 45 million tons. Due to the sanctions, grain production in Russia has increased. Of course, not just like that, but for this purpose, programs of assistance to farmers and agricultural holdings were adopted.
    Now Russians are experiencing difficulties with the automotive and aircraft industry. But they have adopted programs for the development of these industries. So after a while, new SSJ-100, MS-21, IL-114, IL-96, TU-204 and other aircraft will rise into the sky. The Russians will displace Airbus and Boeing from their market. Thus, sanctions will create new competitors for Western companies. Is it bad for Russia? It’s bad now. It will be better soon.
    If someone thinks that the Russians will not be able to buy the necessary spare parts for the operation of their aircraft, then he is a very naive person. They can. It will cost a little more, but nothing is impossible.
    Will there be no Western investments ? Now Russia sells oil and gas in smaller volumes than in 2021, but receives more money due to the price increase. Part of this money may well replace Western investments.

  3. Gary Jacobs

    November 21, 2022 at 8:21 am

    Serhio,

    Always failing to see the big picture. Sure, Russia’s grain exports increased after 2014. But then Russia went and stole grain from Ukraine and tried to sell it off as its own. And now other countries are ramping up production to replace Russian grain…and everything else they can replace that Russia produces ASAP.

    Russian oil needs an $85/per barrel price to be profitable. The Brent crude price is about that right now, having come down $40+ a barrel since its peak. Expect that to go down another $10 over the next couple months.

    Germany just finished its first floating LNG conversion terminal. They have 2 more coming. there are 30 LNG ships off the coast of EU countries from the US Australia and more. Israel and Egypt signed a deal to send gas to Egypts LNG facility to ship to EU. Dont expect Russia to ever be a gas player in the EU again. Now Russia has to sell everything at a discount to India and China. Good luck sustaining that.

    As well, there is a handy group of people that translate Russian TV under the title Russian Media Monitor. Its run by journalist Julia Davis.

    Literally the best summary of Putin’s medieval Russia & its disastrous invasion of Ukraine “We [Russia] don’t have toilet bowls, but they [Ukraine] do.” And the all time classic, “We [Russia] weren’t ready for a war that we started.”

    Russia has a toilet bowl problem.

    More than 1/5 of Russian households do not have access to indoor plumbing, according to official statistics obtained by the RBC news website on Tuesday.

    Russia leads the developed world with the worst sanitation record, according to the London based WaterAid NGO. A 2012 estimate citing official data placed the number of Russians whose households are only equipped with outhouses at 35 million, or roughly a quarter of the population.

    Sure, Ukraine is leaning toward Europe and the West because it offers an escape from Russian world. But … the West also promises the kind of prosperity Russia doesn’t even pretend to deliver to its own people [aside from the oligarchs, of course]. Compare Poland’s economic development [25th of 45 in Europe], measured by per capita GDP, compared to Belarus [36th].

    They both started out in the same place post Soviet breakup.

    In fact, look at the bottom of Europe’s per-capita GDP chart: Almost all of them are part of Russia’s sphere, or have been screwed by Serbia, also part of Russia’s sphere:

    In fact, there are Russian troops in Belarus, plus Armenia (41), Georgia (42), Moldova (44), and Ukraine (45). To remain in Russia’s sphere of influence means to remain an economic backwater.

    This has always been Russia’s biggest PR problem not just their brutality and imperialism. The world gravitates toward the US and EU despite some troubled history because in the end, economic prosperity is more attractive than pooping in a hole in an outhouse in the middle of winter.

    Judging by what I see of Russian troops themselves posting videos about the thin plastic sheets they pin up between trees as tents in Ukraine, I would say Russian kleptocracy, corruption, and arrogance is about freeze to death more Russian soldiers than the Ukrainian army will kill. Considering how many Russian troops died of frostbite last year…it’s a testament to just how little Putin and his oligarchs care about their canon fodder soldiers. That’s the system you are so desperate to try and defend.

    As for Russia’s military aircraft exports… they are headed for a nosedive. Before the invasion of Ukraine, Russia’s aerospace leadership had planned to market the next generation heavy fighter bomber, the Su-57, and its highly touted derivative the Su-75 to several foreign military buyers. These plans now appear to be in ruins.

    The Su-57 suffers from a low production rate. Export models are unlikely to be available until the end of the decade. As for the medium-weight Su-75, the so-called “Checkmate” aircraft, it has been only realized in models and computer graphics. It’s yet to have a single successful test flight.

    For foreign buyers, that leaves the Sukhoi 35 (Su-35), the only Russian military aircraft in serial production. This is Russia’s signature heavy fighter bomber — although its combat record over the skies of Ukraine is mixed. But even the Su-35 might not be successfully exported in any significant numbers this decade.

    India is cancelling orders of Russian military equipment left and right…and instead buying from the west. They have already taken delivery of french Rafales, and are considering F18s. In 2020 they spent $3 Billion on US military helicopters. They are likely to continue cancelling orders from Russia and order more from the US because Russia cant fill the orders.

    I could go on for days like this, but for now I digress…

    Have a liberating day.

  4. Roger Bacon

    November 21, 2022 at 4:19 pm

    It’s a little depressing to read that it’s only 27 countries that have sanctions on Russia. How many countries are there in the world? Like 170-something? Granted, most of them have negligible GDP. We all know China would never join team sanctions but we should put pressure on Inida to get on board. Start by cancelling all those H1B visas in the US. Threatening to send a million Indians back to India would get the point across very quickly. It would also improve wages in America for software engineers. Win-Win.

  5. Serhio

    November 22, 2022 at 3:09 am

    Gary Jacobs

    “Sure, Russia’s grain exports increased after 2014. But then Russia went and stole grain from Ukraine and tried to sell it off as its own. And now other countries are ramping up production to replace Russian grain…and everything else they can replace that Russia produces ASAP.”

    If you had carefully read what I wrote, you would have seen that I did not write anything about how much Russia exported in 2022. The grain that was in the territories of the former Ukrainian and now under the control of Russia is an ordinary trophy. During the war, the side that wins takes the trophy. Didn’t you know that?

  6. Serhio

    November 22, 2022 at 3:10 am

    Gary Jacobs

    “Russian oil needs an $85/per barrel price to be profitable. The Brent crude price is about that right now, having come down $40+ a barrel since its peak. Expect that to go down another $10 over the next couple months.”

    Who said such nonsense? Your attempts to lie are not confirmed by statistics. Look at the price chart for several years. From 2015 to the end of 2021, prices per barrel of oil fluctuated in the range of $ 40-60, sometimes rising above or falling below. So Russia has been selling its oil at a loss all this time? Who would believe that? Different sources indicate different figures, but everyone agrees that the cost of oil production in Russia is at the level of $ 25-40 per barrel, depending on the field. In addition, we should not forget about such a science as mathematics. Russian Russian oil costs an average of $ 30 and compare the summer of 2020 (then oil was sold for about $ 40 per barrel) with the summer of 2022, then we will see that in 2020, Russians for each barrel received a profit of $ 10. And in 2022, they received $50-70 from each barrel. Thus, even if Russians sell 5 times less oil, their incomes will not decrease compared to 2020. It may upset you, but you will have to live with this knowledge.

  7. Serhio

    November 22, 2022 at 3:11 am

    Gary Jacobs

    “Germany just finished its first floating LNG conversion terminal. They have 2 more coming. there are 30 LNG ships off the coast of EU countries from the US Australia and more. Israel and Egypt signed a deal to send gas to Egypts LNG facility to ship to EU. Dont expect Russia to ever be a gas player in the EU again. Now Russia has to sell everything at a discount to India and China. Good luck sustaining that.”

    Germany will build terminals. And will buy LNG. Europe will not freeze this winter and next. That’s just one small, but very important detail: the price. It will not just be higher, but much higher. There is simply not as much LNG in the world as Europe consumed gas from Russia. This means that the industry will leave Europe for those countries where gas is cheaper. These are the USA, Turkey, China (these two countries continue to receive cheap gas from the Russian pipe) and Russia (to a lesser extent). Gas is not only heating. Not much gas is needed for heating. The main gas consumption is the production of fertilizers, polymers, glass, metal. If there is no cheap gas, then all this will be impossible to produce in Europe and will have to be purchased in other countries. The United States is pushing Europe to impose sanctions against Russia, which has put the Europeans under attack. Simultaneously weakening two competitors: the European Union and Russia. And the fools in Europe happily agreed to this. Another step has been taken to turn Europe into a colony of the USA. Europe will turn from an industrially developed region into a quiet and cozy home for elderly pensioners.

  8. Serhio

    November 22, 2022 at 3:12 am

    Gary Jacobs

    “Literally the best summary of Putin’s medieval Russia & its disastrous invasion of Ukraine “We [Russia] don’t have toilet bowls, but they [Ukraine] do.”

    There are people in Russia who hate Russia. Someone sincerely, someone for American money. And there are separate newspapers and TV channels that Russians call “garbage dumps”. There is not a single positive word about Russia on these channels. It is from these channels that the dirt flows, which people like you are happy to pick up. A lie in half with the truth, however, is presented as the truth. And lies about toilet bowls from among them.
    If there is no public water supply in the house, it does not mean that there is none at all. Residents of private houses can use wells and artesian wells. Individuals should not register wells for water. Registration is not necessary if you extract water for personal purposes, and consumption does not exceed 100 cubic meters per day. Therefore, there are no statistics on the presence of these wells. All these people are considered “without toilets”. Some of them really go to a wooden house with a hole in the floor. And someone has a septic tank or a biotoilet. But no one knows how many of them. I don’t know. You don’t know. The journalists don’t know. Only God knows.

  9. Serhio

    November 22, 2022 at 3:13 am

    Gary Jacobs

    “As for Russia’s military aircraft exports… they are headed for a nosedive. Before the invasion of Ukraine, Russia’s aerospace leadership had planned to market the next generation heavy fighter bomber, the Su-57, and its highly touted derivative the Su-75 to several foreign military buyers. These plans now appear to be in ruins.”

    When I wrote about Russian aviation, I only talked about civilian aircraft. It would be strange if the Russians started selling weapons to other countries en masse while they are at war with Ukraine and preparing to fight with NATO. This is not happening. No new contracts are being concluded. If Russia loses in this war, it will not matter at all what it exports and to whom. However, if Russia wins, it will be a wonderful advertisement for their weapons and sales will increase. Now the generals of all countries are carefully looking at Ukraine and feverishly writing down their conclusions in notebooks.

  10. Frank Martin

    November 22, 2022 at 6:17 pm

    Who selects the writers for these articles? With all we know, unless you’re imbibing MSM propaganda, Russia is doing far better than Western economies. Ukraine has perhaps 60 to 90 days left before the Russians overwhelm them once the ground has frozen. This is a garbage article.

  11. Gary Jacobs

    November 23, 2022 at 9:49 am

    Serhio,

    Your casual ability to justify thievery of resources that rightfully belong to Ukraine says so much about Russian kleptocracy. Russia is a mafia state that cheats and steals to take for itself anything it wants without a care in the world for the people you are stealing from.

    I highly recommend Bill Browder’s books Red Notice and Freezing Order for a 1st hand account of a legit businessman trying to work in Russia who finds out the hard way what state sanctioned thievery and murder in Russia is all about. Browder’s ordeal’s are the backstory of the Magnitsky Act, which has frozen so much of Russian Oligarch and Kleptocrat assets..

    As well, The EU’s recent vote labelling Russia a terrorist state paves the way for seizing more of Russian assets and transferring them to Ukraine.

    Furthermore…you are also projecting lying onto me when you have been on the wrong side of my analysis about the fall of Kherson, the ability of the Kerch Bridge to support heavy transport, and so very much more. you dont even know that the 3mm difference in 152mm vs. 155mm artillery is not the key metric. Its the 300mm extra length that makes NATO artillery shells so much better. And yet you still have the arrogance to pretend you know what you are talking about.

    On Russia’s economy the changing shape of the state budget reflects Russia’s efforts to bolster its military effort in Ukraine, where it has lost substantial ground since September despite proclaiming the annexation of four regions it partly occupies. Putin has ordered the central government and the country’s 80+ regions to work more “effectively” together to support the military’s needs.

    On paper, defence spending will rise by just 1% next year to 4.98 trillion roubles – but only because it was revised up by a third this year, from an initially planned 3.5 trillion roubles, after Moscow sent its troops into Ukraine in February.

    By contrast, domestic security spending is set to rise 50.1%, to 4.42 trillion roubles.

    Putin has said that sanctions are boomeranging on Western countries, and there is some inflation tied to the war. Better policy in the west would offset more of that, such as restarting the Keystone XL pipeline [among other things]… but that’s a story for another day.

    The real issue is Russia’s economy is being hit much worse.

    It shrank 4% year-on-year in the third quarter, reflecting the sanctions and the Kremlin’s decision to call up 300,000 reservists. Hundreds of thousands of others fled the country to avoid the draft.

    The 2023 budget will see spending on the “national economy” – including roads, agriculture, and research and development – fall by 23% to 3.5 trillion roubles. Healthcare is to get 9% less – or 1.5 trillion roubles – while education spending will be cut by 2% to 1.4 trillion roubles.

    Infrastructure and industrial spending will fall by 23.5% and 18.5% respectively, according to a joint study by the Russian Presidential Academy [Ranepa] and the Gaidar Institute. That “could trigger significant difficulties” at a time when Moscow is trying to find new markets away from the West, the institutes said.

    Investment in research and development will be cut, too, and “a number of crucial industries will not have enough funds to develop domestic technologies”, Ranepa said, as western sanctions cut Moscow off from the newest technologies.

    Bottom line: Russia’s economy is in trouble in the short term, and it will only get worse over the long term.

    I could go on for days like this, but for now I digress.

    Have a liberating day.

  12. Serhio

    November 23, 2022 at 8:18 pm

    Gary Jacobs
    “Your careless ability to justify the theft of resources that rightfully belong to Ukraine says a lot about the Russian kleptocracy. Russia is a mafia state that cheats and steals to take whatever it wants for itself, without caring at all about the people you steal from.”

    I am always struck by the brazen duplicity of Western propagandists. When Russians take a trophy in war, it is bad and reprehensible. But when the United States steals oil belonging to the Syrians by millions of barrels, then everyone modestly closes their eyes and sticks their dirty tongue up their ass. Would you like to criticize this robbery?

  13. Serhio

    November 23, 2022 at 8:30 pm

    Gary Jacobs
    “In addition, the recent EU vote declaring Russia a terrorist country paves the way for the seizure of more Russian assets and their transfer to Ukraine.”

    Your news is outdated. Yesterday I signed a decree on the dissolution of the EU. My decree has about the same legal force as the decision you are talking about :). I wrote a long time ago that the United States and its allies stole Russian reserves and you objected to me that they were not stolen but “frozen”. However, I have repeatedly written that this money will stand across the throat of robbers. In the crisis that has broken out, the West will lose much more than it could steal. And the main thing is that he has lost this trust. Now many people in the world will think ten times whether to trust their money to scammers.

  14. Serhio

    November 23, 2022 at 9:00 pm

    Gary Jacobs
    “In addition… you are also projecting lies on me when you were on the wrong side of my analysis about the fall of Kherson, about the Kerch Bridge’s ability to support heavy transport and much more. you don’t even know that the difference of 3mm in 152mm versus 155mm artillery is not a key indicator. An additional 300 mm makes NATO artillery shells much better. And yet you still have the nerve to pretend you know what you’re talking about.”

    The one who starts lying always lies, including in small things. When we were arguing about Kherson, I said that Ukrainians would not be able to break through the Russian defenses and occupy Kherson with battles in the terms you mentioned. They couldn’t, although they tried many times. It looks very much like the Russians and the United States have secretly agreed on something and the withdrawal of troops from Kherson is part of the agreements. And it is possible that the reduction of arms supplies to Ukraine, which Nato is now talking about, is just part of that very deal. The voices of various high-ranking politicians began to be heard very synchronously from different sources that Nato could no longer supply weapons to Ukraine without weakening its own army.

    I have repeatedly written that you took a piece of the phrase about shells out of context. The full phrase had the following meaning: “the advantages of the 3 mm (not 300 mm) caliber of 155 mm shells over 152 mm are much less than the advantages of the 203 mm projectile over 155 mm.” You claim that I stated that the 3mm does not give an advantage to the NATO caliber. Gives. But it’s about like two yard hooligans arguing who is stronger. But against a professional boxer, both have no chance. That’s what I wrote about.

    When it came to the movement of trains across the bridge, I referred to a video of a freight train moving across the bridge against the background of a floating crane that is making repairs. That is, this video was definitely shot after the terrorist attack. Anyone can go to YouTube and watch this video. You, as a confirmation of your words, cannot provide anything other than the words that someone said. The words spoken during the war are lighter than fluff and prove nothing.

  15. Serhio

    November 23, 2022 at 9:35 pm

    Gary Jacobs

    “In the third quarter, it decreased by 4% year-on-year due to sanctions and the Kremlin’s decision to call up 300,000 reservists. Hundreds of thousands of others fled the country to avoid conscription.”

    Did I say somewhere that the sanctions did not damage the Russian economy at all? That’s just a drop in GDP by a measly 4% is not the goal pursued by Western countries. Their goal was to bring down the Russian economy. Tear it to shreds and cause mass unrest among Putin’s opponents. Although, as far as I remember, Barack Obama personally tore it to shreds when he was president. at least that’s what he claimed. However, the problems in the countries that imposed sanctions are much more serious. Both in politics and in economics. In some countries, the governments that imposed sanctions have already changed. And in the UK, two governments have already changed. It is not Russians who go out with rallies, but Germans, Czechs, Belgians, French and other Europeans.
    If we talk about those who fled abroad in Russia, then it is the majority of those who left and would have to take to the streets and overthrow Putin according to the idea of the initiators of sanctions. Those who have remained in Russia support or are neutral towards Putin. Russian special services have received a significant list of potentially disloyal people. If these people return, many of them will be asked some unpleasant questions. It is likely that some of those who returned will receive a “red card” and their career advancement in the Russian government will be greatly hampered. This will only make Russia stronger. No one needs traitors to their country in power.

  16. Serhio

    November 23, 2022 at 10:32 pm

    Gary Jacobs

    “The 2023 budget will see spending on the “national economy” – including roads, agriculture, and research and development – fall by 23% to 3.5 trillion roubles. Healthcare is to get 9% less – or 1.5 trillion roubles – while education spending will be cut by 2% to 1.4 trillion roubles.

    Infrastructure and industrial spending will fall by 23.5% and 18.5% respectively, according to a joint study by the Russian Presidential Academy [Ranepa] and the Gaidar Institute. That “could trigger significant difficulties” at a time when Moscow is trying to find new markets away from the West, the institutes said.”

    t is too early to talk about the budget of Russia. It has not been accepted yet. There is only a draft that can change significantly in the process of consideration in the State Duma and the Federation Council. But even here you couldn’t resist lying.

    For example, in the Russian budget of 2022, signed by Putin on December 7, 2021, 1.245 trillion rubles were allocated for healthcare (about 1.45-1.5 trillion rubles will actually be spent). The project allocated 1.5 trillion rubles for 2023. There is no decrease, but compared to the figures planned for 2022, there is an increase of 20%.

    In 2023, it is planned to increase by 6.5% such an important indicator as the “МРОТ” (minimum wage) on the basis of which many payments and benefits are calculated.

    For the program of integrated development of rural areas, an additional allocation of 8 billion rubles is provided next year, including for the reclamation of agricultural land and for the support of scientific and technical projects of the agro—industrial complex.

    Some of the articles compared to last year are divided into
    several, some of the articles are combined. The budget is a separate complex topic and I don’t think that you, with your propaganda approach and love of lies, should write about it. The truth in your posts is thickly mixed with fiction and tendentious assumptions.

  17. Serhio

    November 23, 2022 at 10:48 pm

    Gary Jacobs

    “Investment in research and development will be cut, too, and “a number of crucial industries will not have enough funds to develop domestic technologies”, Ranepa said, as western sanctions cut Moscow off from the newest technologies.”

    Everything is not so clear. While the United States was increasing its debt with giant steps, Russia created a National welfare Fund, which received “excess” revenues from oil exports. As a result, more than 8 trillion rubles have accumulated there, and some of this money (according to various estimates, up to half over the next 3 years) Russians plan to spend on investment projects.
    If the West goes too far, the Russians may well pass a law that cancels all patents on the intellectual property of hostile states on the territory of Russia. This will significantly reduce the cost of developing new technologies and using existing technologies without paying royalties to enemies.

  18. Attila

    November 26, 2022 at 4:29 am

    Peskov says Russia will stop bombing civilians if Ukraine agree to negotiate how dare this Ogre of a supposedly man ask the country they invaded to sit down and accept all the Russian atrocities and cede 20 percent of their land to a TERRORIST DESIGNATED NATION WHO EXCEED THAT TITLE DAILY THE MOST EVIL SAVAGES AND VULGAR 3RD WORLD SCUM EVER TO WALK THE EARTH.TIME TO STOP FEARING PUTINS REACTIONS AND LET HIM FEAR UKRAINE ACTIONS GIVE UKRAINE LONG RANGE MISSILES NOW LET IT DESTROY MOSCOW AND ST PETERSBURG AND DESTROY HIS OIL FACILITIES .LET PUTIN KNOW WHAT ITS LIKE TO BE ON THE RECEIVING END DO UNTO OTHERS WHAT THEY DO TO YOU. RUSSIA WILL BE DESCIMATED WITHIN MINUTES BY THE WEST 5 MINUTES ITS ALL IT TAKES FOR NATO TO ERASE RUSSIA OFF THE PLANET.THE WEST WOULD NOT BE TOTALLY WIPED OUT IN WAR BUT RUSSIA WOULD.UKRAINE MUST BE ALLOWED TO TO ATTACK RUSSIA VENHEMENTLYY AND PERPETUALLY AND DESTROY THE TERRORIST SCUM.

  19. Serhio

    November 27, 2022 at 9:31 pm

    Attila

    You’re a sick person. Do you want the world to burn down in a nuclear war? Maybe it’s easier for you to commit suicide? In this case, at least other people will not suffer.

  20. Time for Some Truth

    November 28, 2022 at 4:27 am

    Wow hey, ok then Serhio.
    *cue hearty laughing*

    Oh my word…the astonishingly hilarious lack of self-awareness.

    10,000 words plus, (I am sure of it, at least 10,000, or maybe that is just because of how painful it was to read just some of this absurd nonsense), with such excruciatingly little self-awareness while trying to claim both the victimhood AND the noble virtue of a so-called white knight saving a poor damsel in distress, of absolute tripe.

    Clearly then, Stavros cannot be the only one begging for spare change to flout propaganda tripe, can he?

    Talking about being naive, the whole ‘the Russian budget won’t be affected, ok Putin said so, just you wait and see’ is too cute man.

    Uhm, yeah, total from that absolutely overwhelming economic giant, with its HUGE (insert hysterical laughing face) GDP that dwarfs the GDP of their European peers…oh wait.

    Lastly, ANYONE who actually thinks the export economy is the true target of the sanctions, imposed by people who ACTUALLY DO UNDERSTAND Real-Politick, is the actual definition of naive!

    Absolutely, it would be nice-to-have for the Western Bloc if the world would/could go along with it, but the Western block always has known that you cannot ask starving countries to forego food for politics, it hasn’t even been hinted at once.

    The value-add economy (the import economy) is the target, crippling Russia’s ability to be ANYTHING MORE THAN A SHELL OF ITS POTENTIAL SELF while under the rule of Putin.

    Talking about how Russia may rise and provide for herself technologically just makes me stare with a blank face, so in 20 years plus Putin failed to do that already?!

    I thought he was the wisest, greatest leader in human history??

    Where was his foresight then, since HE KNEW EVERYTHING the West was apparently up to, from the start??
    (Still waiting for logical answer on that, is the west still apparently actually invading Russia, to apparently conquer it, Russia once again, who has thousands of nukes and the whole triad of deterrent to assure Europe and American annihilation ? uhm…ok)

  21. Serhio

    November 28, 2022 at 9:12 pm

    Time for Some Truth

    “Talking about being naive, the whole ‘the Russian budget won’t be affected, ok Putin said so, just you wait and see’ is too cute man.”

    You can’t read or think. I have NEVER written that Russia will not suffer losses from sanctions at ALL. She will have losses and losses. However, Western countries failed to “tear the Russian economy to shreds”. And now the West is falling into a big economic crisis. This crisis began long before February 2022, but the Russian-Ukrainian crisis gave impetus to its acceleration. In this crisis, the West will lose much more than Russia. Because Russia sells real things: gas, oil, grain, metals, fertilizers, weapons. The West trades too much in “air” and it is this trade that falls the most during crises. And since the Western countries are very much interconnected, they will fall together. The West is used to living richly at someone else’s expense. It’s in the past. The future is not so joyful.

    “Still waiting for logical answer on that, is the west still apparently actually invading Russia, to apparently conquer it, Russia once again, who has thousands of nukes and the whole triad of deterrent to assure Europe and American annihilation ?”

    I think that NATO is already at war with Russia. The fact that this war has not been officially declared does not change anything in fact. The largest military bloc on the planet generously finances one of the parties to the conflict, supplies modern equipment, trains soldiers and supplies entire units of its fighters under the guise of “Polish PMCs”. And we can only hope that it will not come to nuclear weapons and Russia will not be fenced off from NATO by a nuclear desert along the Berlin-Prague-Vienna line. It would bring too much pain to all of humanity.

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