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Russia’s New Borei-A Class Submarine Looks Dangerous

Submarines
Russia's Borei-class Ballistic Missile Submarine. Image Credit: Creative Commons.

Why Russia’s New Borei-A Class Submarine Looks Dangerous: During the Cold War, the Soviet Navy had the largest fleet of submarines in the world. From 1945 through 1991, the Soviet Union built 727 submarines, including 235 with nuclear propulsion. Today, despite the fact the Russian Navy is vastly smaller in overall size, it still commands one of the largest submarine fleets with an estimated 58 vessels – around a dozen of which are nuclear-powered.

Even as the Kremlin has attempted to modernize its submarines, it is also seeking to produce even more modern boats. This includes the Generalissimus Suvorov, a Borei-class (Project 955A) nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine developed by the Rubin Design Bureau and constructed by the Sevmash for the Russian Navy.

Named after Alexander Vasilyevich Suvorov, an 18th century Prince of the Russian Empire and last “Generalissimo” (a rank superior to field marshal), the boat was laid down at the Sevmash Shipyard (part of the United Shipbuilding Corporation) in late December 2014.

Back in November of 2022, Russian state media reported that the Generalissimus Suvorov had concluded all rounds of testing in the White Sea. Last week, the submarine successfully fired an RSM-56 Bulava (NATO reporting name: SS-N-32) intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) in the northern White Sea with a dummy payload as part of final testing. The missile successfully hit a target at the Kura range on the Kamchatka Peninsula.

“The Shipyard’s delivery team and the ship’s crew have practiced the assignments in full. The Generalissimus Suvorov has completed all the stages of trials, making several deployments to the sea. The ship’s systems have been tested in various modes,” Sevmash Shipyard CEO Mikhail Budnichenko told Tass.

This latest nuclear-powered submarine is now being prepared for delivery to the Russian Navy, Budnichenko added.

Borei-A”: A Truly Advanced Submarine

This latest strategic sub belongs to the fourth generation of nuclear-powered submarines developed for the Russian Navy under the improved Borei-A Project – designed by the St. Petersburg-based Rubin Central Design Bureau of Marine Engineering. The Project is reportedly developing fundamentally new technical solutions, improved equipment, reduced physical fields, enhanced protection, and indigenous components.

Compared to the baseline Borei series, the improved Borei-A submarines feature better acoustic stealth, maneuvering, and deep-sea running capabilities and an improved armament control system. Borei- and improved Borei-A-class submarines carry sixteen Bulava intercontinental ballistic missiles, in vertical silos placed in two rows in four and five compartments, along with eight 533mm torpedoes, and six disposable non-rechargeable Barrage launchers for launching the hydroacoustic countermeasures MG-104 Brosok or MG-114 Beryl.

The Bulava is designed to carry a nuclear warhead.

The Generalissimus Suvorov is the second Borei-A class submarine to be built. Moscow says it is equipped with cutting-edge navigation, radio engineering, sonar, and missile and torpedo weaponry systems. The Borei-A-class lead submarine, Knyaz Vladimir, was delivered to the Russian Navy on June 12, 2020.

The advanced submarine cruiser is set to join and bolster the Russian Pacific Fleet’s force of nuclear-powered submarines after she is commissioned before the end of the year.

Russia

Russia’s Borei-class ballistic missile submarine.

Russia Boomer Submarines

Borei-class Submarine. Image Credit: Russian Government.

Russian Navy Borei-class.

Russian Navy Borei-class.

A Senior Editor for 19FortyFive, Peter Suciu is a Michigan-based writer. He has contributed to more than four dozen magazines, newspapers, and websites with over 3,000 published pieces over a twenty-year career in journalism. He regularly writes about military hardware, firearms history, cybersecurity, and international affairs. Peter is also a Contributing Writer for Forbes. You can follow him on Twitter: @PeterSuciu.

Written By

Expert Biography: A Senior Editor for 1945, Peter Suciu is a Michigan-based writer who has contributed to more than four dozen magazines, newspapers, and websites with over 3,000 published pieces over a twenty-year career in journalism. He regularly writes about military hardware, firearms history, cybersecurity, and international affairs. Peter is also a Contributing Writer for Forbes. You can follow him on Twitter: @PeterSuciu.

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